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About

Michael Snow
Clothed Woman (In Memory of my Father) 1963
oil and lucite on canvas
152 x 386.2 cm
Purchased 1966
National Gallery of Canada

1990s

NEW HOME FOR THE CMCP AND RECORD CROWDS FOR RENOIR

The Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography moves—with its 158,000 works—into a custom-made home. Renoir’s Portraits: Impression of an Age attracts record crowds.

Previous Decade | 1990 | 1992 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | Next Decade >>

1990

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MAJOR CHANGES

Bill C 12, The Museums Act, receives Royal assent, proclaims the National Gallery of Canada as a Crown corporation, and appoints a new Board of Trustees.

1992

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MAJOR CHANGES

On 7 May, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography (CMCP), an affiliate of the National Gallery of Canada, officially opens its specially designed building on Rideau Street, making its collection infinitely more accessible to the public.

Housed mostly below street level in the former site of an old Canadian Pacific Railway tunnel under Confederation Square, between the Chateau Laurier Hotel and the Rideau Canal locks, the $16.5 million building boasts state-of-the-art galleries, a research centre, a museum shop, archival storage, a video room, and a small theatre. Architect Michael Lundhom ensures the attention of passers-by with his design of a concrete and glass entrance (echoing the Colonnade of the National Gallery) that opens onto Wellington Street.

The CMCP collection includes some 161,000 images, including photographs, negatives and transparencies, as well as books, filmstrips, audio-visual presentations, and other documents related to still photography.

COLLECTIONS

The National Gallery’s collection of Inuit Art gets its own permanent galleries on the lower level below the Great Hall.

1996

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MAJOR CHANGES

The National Gallery launches its first website at http://national.gallery.ca in English and http://musee.beaux-arts.ca in French.

The 1995-96 fiscal year results in over 600,000 visitors, a record attendance since 1989.

1997

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MAJOR CHANGES

The National Gallery of Canada Foundation is established to promote private support for the Gallery.

EXHIBITIONS

Renoir’s Portraits: Impressions of an Age sets an exhibition attendance record with 340,000 visitors.

1998

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DIRECTORS

Pierre Théberge is appointed as the new Director of the National Gallery of Canada.

A noted member of the arts community for nearly four decades, Pierre Théberge is a graduate in art history of the Université de Montréal and also studied at the Courtauld Institute in London. From 1986 to 1997, Mr. Théberge served as Director of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, where his original and dynamic programming strengthened the Museum’s international profile. The planning and construction of the Jean-Noël-Desmarais Pavilion was also completed during his tenure.

Numerous honours mark the progression of Pierre Théberge’s remarkable career. He was appointed Knight of the Ordre national du Québec in 1992, and Officer of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government in 1994. In 2001, he was appointed Officer of the Order of Canada by Governor-General Adrienne Clarkson, for his exceptional contribution to the visual arts in Canada. In 2002, he received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal, awarded to Canadians who have made a significant contribution to their country, their community or their fellow citizens. Also in 2002, the Austrian government conferred on him the Cross of Honour for Arts and Science.

Pierre Théberge was born in 1942 in St-Éleuthère, in the Kamouraska region of Quebec.

COLLECTIONS

The Gallery launches its first Audioguide program for the Canadian collection and summer exhibitions in English and French.

1999

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MAJOR CHANGES

Following an intensively active two years of research and development, the virtual encyclopedia of the Gallery’s collection, CyberMuse, goes on-line at http://cybermuse.gallery.ca.

The most advanced system of its kind in the world, with the capacity to expand and add new functionality, CyberMuse enables the on-line visitor to access comprehensive information about the art and artists represented in the Gallery’s collection. Among its offerings are such entertaining and innovative activities as on-line virtual tours of the collections, artists’ biographies, audio and video interviews with artists and curators, video animation, historical timelines, visitor feedback, and much more.

CyberMuse was made possible with the generous support of the AMEX Foundation.

The Gallery also launches its Vernissage magazine in May.

EXHIBITIONS

Terre Sauvage: The Canadian Landscape and the Group of Seven, an exhibition organized by the National Gallery of Canada, receives international acclaim when it travels to Mexico, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and China.